Making Fermented Cabbage

Below is the general recipe I use for making fermented cabbage for my dogs, I started feeding fermented cabbage earlier this year and I see a HUGE difference when using it with my dogs! 

I started with a general fermentation recipe, and for later batches I added the probiotic and really liked that as well! (Thank you Dr. Karen Becker!) 

1 head of green cabbage 

1 probiotic capsule 

Salt (I like to use Celtic Sea salt) 

Mason jars with a fermenting lid 

Fermenting weights 

Wooden pounder (optional)

  • Chop the cabbage into small pieces, saving a couple of the outside leaves whole, set them aside Try to make them as close to the same size as possible. I like to cut them into about 1″ size pieces, that is the size my dogs like. 
  • Put all of your cabbage into a large bowl, add about 2 tablespoons of salt, this can vary with the amount of cabbage you are using, 2 tablespoons for one cabbage seems to work for me. I also open one probiotic capsule and add it to the bowl. 
  • this is the long and hard part! If you have a pounder you can start pounding the cabbage, if you don’t have a pounder you can mash it with your hands. (this is what I do) I will work the cabbage for about 10-15 mins and then let it rest for about 10 mins, and then mash again for 10-15 mins. I am wanting the cabbage to have enough water worked out that we can use that to fill the jars. 
  • once you have worked the cabbage, it should have shrunk by about half, now we get to fill the jars! 
  • I use Ball mason jars, I like the 32 ounce wide mouth jars. Start filling the jars with your cabbage, gently pressing the cabbage down, we want to work out the air bubbles. 
  • fill the jar until you have about an 1″ – 2″ gap at the top (headspace), as you press the cabbage down, water should be coming up to the top. If you don’t have enough to cover the cabbage, add a little from your bowl. (And if you don’t have enough water in the bowl you can use some tap water, I add a little salt to it if I need to use tap) 
  • Now take your extra cabbage leaf, cut it down so it fits into the jar, you want it to cover your cabbage and hold it under the water. I then put my ferment weight on top. 
  • Now just put your fermenting lid on and you are ready to go! 
  • I have found that about 3 weeks is the perfect ferment for my dogs, they like the taste and it has been pretty consistent for me. if I ferment it too long they aren’t as fond of the taste as it gets a bit sour. 

This is a live video I did on the Fluid Motion Facebook page making a batch of cabbage, I used red cabbage in this video, which I wasn’t fond of, I like green better. 🙂 https://www.facebook.com/fluidmotionagilityandwellness/videos/308044960064903/

Supply Links: 

(The below links are affiliate links and a small amount from purchases made at that link will go to Fluid Motion, all profits go towards the Fluid Motion blog and Youtube series) 

Mason Jars – https://amzn.to/2u8xaq9

Silicone Fermenting Lids – https://amzn.to/358bqan 

Fermenting Weights – https://amzn.to/2QD0oES

Pickle Pounder – https://amzn.to/2tkRzYh

Grey Sea Salt – https://amzn.to/37oxNtK

Probiotic- 

I also found this pretty cool kit that has everything but the jars and salt which is pretty cool – https://amzn.to/36dCmH5 

Published by Amanda Nelson

Amanda Nelson is well known for her distance handling skills, and she has been traveling the country and teaching seminars for 20+ years. She has traveled around the world to Australia, Japan, Netherlands, England, Switzerland and the Philippines teaching all levels of agility, with nearly all dog breeds. Amanda focuses on teaching teamwork as well as how to create a strong connection between dog and handler. She works with all styles of handling, from running with your dog to distance handling. Amanda tailors each training session, large or small, to the dog and handler to help bring out the best in the team. Her training techniques consist of a large amounts of targeting, food rewards, and toy rewards. Creating a fun learning environment for the dog encourages a fast, fun, and motivated dog in the agility ring. Amanda uses a combination of Upper Body Cues, Lower Body Cues, and Verbal Cues. This system was derived from the natural cues that most dogs read and pick up quickly. Handlers are taught how to use all of these cues, together, to create a customized handling system that can be tailored to their unique dog. All of these techniques have resulted in Amanda earning numerous titles with her dogs including the MOD SQUAD award, Purple Achievement Cup, and over 40 NADAC Championship titles. She has won the NADAC Championships multiple times, including winning the Super Stakes and Starter Stakes division. She has also been Top Bonus Dog, Top Purple Dog, and Top Dog of the Year several times in NADAC.

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